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      Sale 2339 | Lot 141
      Price Realized: $5,000With Buyer's Premium
      Show Hammer Price
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      • Sale 2339 Lot 141

        ERNEST LOUIS LESSIEUX (1848-1925) & H. CARREY (DATES UNKNOWN) 1ER GRAND PRIX D'AVIATION / ANGERS. 1912.
        62 3/4x47 inches, 159 1/2x119 1/2 cm. Les Editions Nationales, Paris.
        Condition B+: restored losses and overpainting along vertical and horizontal folds; repaired tears, creases and abrasions in margins and image; light foxing in margins.
        In 1912, the Aero Club of France held a flying competition. This competition was different than the others in that it was "the first contest to show the extent to which the aeroplane could be depended on as an instrument of war . . . A surprising total of thirty-five constructors entered their machines and practically all the famous pilots of Europe were on hand. Most of the military attaches accredited to Paris were present--keenly interested in the potentialities of different monoplanes and biplanes" (Looping the Loop p. 83). In the middle of the event, bad weather forced the competition to be postponed, but not before the great French Aviator Roland Garros successfully landed his aircraft and won the prize. This image has been misidentified as Garros waving in a victory salute as his ground team labors to stop his plane (early planes had no brakes). However, given that the poster is advertising an event to come, that is an impossibility. Rather, it represents an anonymous airman, giving the "OK" sign to his ground crew, who have been holding on to his plane while his engines warm up enough for takeoff. Looping the Loop 55, l'Histoire de l'Aviation p. 72, Sport 182.

        Estimate $5,000 - 7,500


        Price Realized (with Buyer's Premium) $5,000

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