Mar 01, 2012 - Sale 2271

Sale 2271 - Lot 245

Price Realized: $ 7,200
Show Hammer Price?Final Price Realized includes Buyer’s Premium added to Hammer Price
Estimate: $ 5,000 - $ 7,500
INSCRIBED TO CIVIL RIGHTS ADVOCATE SENATOR PAUL H. DOUGLAS (CIVIL RIGHTS.) KING, MARTIN LUTHER JR. Stride Toward Freedom, The Montgomery Story. Illustrated from photographs. 8vo, original cloth-backed boards in an excellent dust jacket.together with a small group of related material, all enclosed in a cloth-covered box. should be seen. New York: Harpers, [1958]

Additional Details

first edition, later printing. With a warm inscription by king to senator paul h. douglas, a long-time fighter for the civil rights commission act of 1957. "To Senator Paul H. Douglas. In appreciation for the great work you have so unselfishly done for the cause of freedom and human dignity. With warm Regards, Martin L King Jr." Paul Howard Douglas (1892-1976), liberal American politician , University of Chicago economist, war ... first edition, later printing. With a warm inscription by king to senator paul h. douglas, a long-time fighter for the civil rights commission act of 1957. "To Senator Paul H. Douglas. In appreciation for the great work you have so unselfishly done for the cause of freedom and human dignity. With warm Regards, Martin L King Jr." Paul Howard Douglas (1892-1976), liberal American politician , University of Chicago economist, war hero, and politician was elected as a Democratic U.S. Senator from Illinois in the 1948 landslide, serving until his defeat in 1966.
Douglas is considered to be one of the all-time great Senators, a true statesman and a tireless fighter for Civil Rights. Included with Dr. King's book are several items relating to Douglas's role in establishing the Commission on Civil Rights in 1957: A copy of that Act, a signed photograph of Douglas, his address on receiving the Sidney Hillman Award in 1957; another award, "the Freedom Fighter Award;" a folder marked "Integration" containing a number of letters addressed to Douglas regarding civil rights, as well as one from him to one of his campaign workers, and the booklet "Obsequies" from Martin Luther King's funeral. Another folder marked "Let My People Go", contains a letter dated September 1957, to Douglas from a Mr. Malcolm Henry Christian, an African-American, presenting him with a mimeographed copy of a seventy-five page "Treatise on Interracial Relations."