Mar 01, 2012 - Sale 2271

Sale 2271 - Lot 246

Price Realized: $ 10,200
Show Hammer Price?Final Price Realized includes Buyer’s Premium added to Hammer Price
Estimate: $ 8,000 - $ 12,000
PRSENTED TO A PHILLIP RANDOLPH WITH EXTENSIVE NOTES BY RANDOLPH (CIVIL RIGHTS.) KING, MARTIN LUTHER JR. Stride Toward Freedom. The Montgomery Story. 8vo, original cloth-backed boards, in a moderately worn dust jacket; lacks the first blank end-paper. Enclosed in a specially made black morocco backed clamshell box. New York, [1958]

Additional Details

first edition of king's first book. an exceptional association copy, with a full-page presentation to a. philip randolph, who has made extensive notes throughout the book. "To my dear friend A. Philip Randolph. In appreciation of the standards of loyalty, honesty, non-violence and the will to endure that you have held before all people in the struggle for freedom, justice and democracy, Martin." Randolph has underlined certain passages ... first edition of king's first book. an exceptional association copy, with a full-page presentation to a. philip randolph, who has made extensive notes throughout the book. "To my dear friend A. Philip Randolph. In appreciation of the standards of loyalty, honesty, non-violence and the will to endure that you have held before all people in the struggle for freedom, justice and democracy, Martin." Randolph has underlined certain passages throughout the book and here and there made marginal notes. In the chapter "The Violence of Desperate Men," for example, Randolph wrote "Southern Senators and Congressmen and politicians, and some religious leaders have created a climate by their violent racist public statements that make racial violence inevitable." In the chapter "Where Do We Go From Here," Randolph has covered numerous pages with notes: "New Negro Consciousness," "America's schizophrenic personality on the question of race," "Lack of Presidential leadership in the racial crisis" and "The verdict of history, a First Class Nation cannot afford second class citizenship." The last third of this book is virtually covered with Randolph's notes and underlining.
In all of the years of writing this catalogue, we cannot recall a more interesting copy of this book. Between King's printed words and the jottings of A. Philip Randolph, it is almost as though these two great fighters for racial equality were having a conversation.