Nov 07, 2017 - Sale 2461

Sale 2461 - Lot 18

Price Realized: $ 6,500
Show Hammer Price?Final Price Realized includes Buyer’s Premium added to Hammer Price
Estimate: $ 3,000 - $ 4,000
"THE INTEGRITY & TALENTS OF HAMILTON ARE ABOVE THE REACH OF [JOHN ADAMS]" PICKERING, TIMOTHY. Autograph Letter Signed, "T. Pickering," as Senator, to former Secretary of War James McHenry, conveying that [Benjamin?] Stoddert agreed to share copies of his communication with [John] Adams concerning the letters Adams published in the Boston Patriot, discussing his own dismissal [resulting from censure in the Senate?], awaiting the reaction to a speech delivered by Governor [Elbridge] Gerry, and encouraging him to read Adams's published letters in which [Alexander] Hamilton is treated with insolence. 1 1/2 pages, 4to, written on recto and verso of single sheet; moderate bleed-through (but still legible), minor scattered ink burn, minor chipping at edges, folds. "Senate Chamber" [Washington], 11 February 1811

Additional Details

". . . I saw Mr. Stoddert last week. A question I asked him led him to say that he had long since read Mr. Adams's first eighteen letters published in the Boston Patriot, and in consequence had written to Mr. Adams a long letter, stating his errors or misrepresentations, that he had rec'd a short, but polite answer, and that he would furnish me with copies of both. He said explicitly that he had no knowledge of the cause of my dismission. I informed him of the corrupt motive. He then mentioned ... ". . . I saw Mr. Stoddert last week. A question I asked him led him to say that he had long since read Mr. Adams's first eighteen letters published in the Boston Patriot, and in consequence had written to Mr. Adams a long letter, stating his errors or misrepresentations, that he had rec'd a short, but polite answer, and that he would furnish me with copies of both. He said explicitly that he had no knowledge of the cause of my dismission. I informed him of the corrupt motive. He then mentioned . . . that . . . Gen'l Smith & his brother-in-law Wilson Cary Nicholas spoke to him . . . [w]hether some means could not be adopted for a reconciliation, or union . . . of parties: but heard no more of it.
"I have not seen the answer of either House of Mass'tts Legislature to Gov'r Gerry's Speech. Otis is president of the Senate, but that body is equally divided, 20 & 20.
"I have no information relative to Serrurier's[?] mission. I cannot imagine that Mr. Dana can have taken offence, because I believe you incapable of intending one . . . .
"If you have not read Mr. Adams's first 18 letters . . . I pray you to read them. His insolence against Hamilton is unexampled; but the integrity & talents of Hamilton are above the reach of his veteran slander. Yet he ought to be scourged with scorpions."
In January of 1811, the U.S. Senate censured Senator Pickering for having sought help from the British to sabotage his political opponents in violation of the Logan Act.