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    Sale 2497 | Lot 105
    Price Realized: $2,375With Buyer's Premium
    Show Hammer Price
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    • Sale 2497 Lot 105

      (WIENER WERKSTÄTTE/FASHION/DESIGN.) Wiener Mode 1914. Volume 8, of 12 portfolios. 12 color woodblock prints on Japan paper, each signed by werkstätte artists Wilhelm Foltin (1), Anny Schröder (3), Hilda Jesser (3), Irene Schaschl (1), Lotte Calm (2), Felice ("Kitty") Rix (1), and Max Snischek (1). 292x210 mm; 11 1/2x8 1/4 inches, sheets. Loose as issued in gold foil-backed paper wrapper and thin printed stiff paper folder with printed label mounted to inside front cover. Vienna, 1914

      Estimate $2,000 - 3,000

      one of only fifty sets of this portfolio produced by the famous viennese workshop. Having introduced a fashion division in 1911, this limited series was produced to introduce new clothing designs by the Werkstätte. They were not intended for general publication, however, but rather to be placed with manufacturers. Between 1914 and 1915, a total of twelve portfolios were created, the contents of each being quite different and each published only once. One hundred copies of Volume One were produced, but only fifty copies of all the subsequent volumes were printed.
      While they took current style queues from the famous couturier Paul Poiret and Orientalism, rather than simply follow the lead of the Paris fashion houses, they created their own unique Viennese style by embracing harem trousers and integrating a revival of Biedermeier fashions with long, swinging skirts and feminine hourglass silhouettes. See Skrypzak, Joann; and Barbara Copeland Buenger, "Design, Vienna, 1890s to 1930s," 2003.


      Price Realized (with Buyer's Premium) $2,375

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