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    Sale 2514 | Lot 25
    Estimate: $500 - $750
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      Sale 2514 Lot 25

      OSCAR WILDE (1854-1900)


      The Priest and the Acolyte * The Harlot's House.

      Together, 2 early works relating to Wilde. The first title with a loosely inserted alternative printed title dated 1894 falsely attributing the work to Wilde. 8vo, wrappers; the first with light spotting, chipped spine ends. The second title loose from binding, endleaves toned. One of 100 copies printed for private circulation only, 1894; 1905.

      Estimate $500 - 750


      The Priest and the Acolyte is a scarce work and a tragic tale of gay love in the Catholic Church. This story and Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young, first appeared in "The Chameleon," 1894, edited by John Francis Bloxam (see lot 28), and, for a while, it was wrongly attributed to Wilde. Their publication and the misattribution had a disastrous effect on Wilde's reputation during the Queensbury suit of "gross indecency." 'It was a tremendous misfortune for Wilde that he allowed himself to be persuaded into contributing to this rather puerile publication…Despite Wilde's indignant denials, counsel succeeded in planting damaging innuendoes in the minds of the jury by continual reference to this magazine, and especially to the particular story which is still generally, though wrongly, considered to be by Wilde . . .'--(Dulau Catalogue 161, #245). Stuart Mason reprinted the story in 1907 with an introduction denying Wilde's authorship. Mason 14-17; Rose 3720.