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    Sale 2480 | Lot 12
    Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
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    • Sale 2480 Lot 12

      JEREMIAH GOODMAN.
      Lord & Taylor. Archive of over 20 illustrations for Lord & Taylor home furnishings, featuring textiles, bedding, furniture, and accessories, circa late 1960s. Pen, ink, and gouache on board. Sizes vary, the smallest measures 130x90 mm; 5x3 1/2 inches. The largest measures 420x310 mm; 16 1/2x12 inches. One is signed "Jeremiah," another is dated 1969, and two feature the hand-drawn Lord & Taylor logo. Accompanied by two kiosk designs for Ed Pinaud cosmetics.

      Estimate $2,000 - 3,000

      Goodman (1922-2017), originally from Niagara Falls, New York, moved to Hollywood to become a set designer, but eventually returned to New York to work in commercial arts and interior illustration. During an age of excess and increase in post-war manufacturing, he and other artists were able to secure full-time work for various advertising agencies and enjoyed loyal corporate accounts.
      Between 1952 and 1985, Goodman provided countless renderings for Lord & Taylor under the direction of Harry Rodman. Goodman's loose, gestural, yet selectively clear style for rendering objects allowed the artist to highlight the details present in objects while contextualizing them in space for them to be readable in photographs. His illustrations of chic homeware appeared in the pages of The New York Times, Vogue, and Harper's Bazaar. As the main cover artist for Interior Design magazine from the early 1950s to late 1960s, he became a household name for his lush rendering of the homes of the social elite, including Carolina Herrera, Bill Blass, and Ronald Reagan.


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